Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 69

Thread: T. Moon's 1,000 recordings to hear before you die

  1. #1

    Default T. Moon's 1,000 recordings to hear before you die

    Shop Denver Broncos Super Bowl Gear
    I'm doing this in A-Z order. (bookshelf cleaning revealed this semi-lost gem, and now I'm going for it.)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20170228_223036.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	94.9 KB 
ID:	10227

    http://www.1000recordings.com/the-list/

  2. The Following 3 Users High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


  3. #2

    Default

    1. Abba, Gold C- (the number will help me keep track of how many I've reviewed, grade explained below)

    Tom Moon doesn't have too many entries in the 'pop' genre, but this is one of them. I've never been a big Abba fan. Even when my best friend expounded on the greatness that is Abba. Meh.

    I listened to Gold and I was surprised by how much I enjoyed each song. Well produced pop music. Some great hooks I didn't realize belonged to them. It was worth the listen, and I'll go back on occasion--like I said...some great hooks.

    I'll use a grade scale for each recording, A through F. A grade of C is not the normal bad grade, it's like...yes, I concur you might be one of the top 1000 recordings ever. C is a very strong grade when it means top 1000. Grades of B or A indicate high likelihood of top 1000 status, C is me saying 50/50, and F is me saying that Moon is proselytizing a weird fetish pick.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  4. The Following 2 Users High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


  5. #3

    Default

    2. Khalifa Ould Eide & Dimi Mint Abba, Moorish Music from Mauritania (1990), D

    From Moon's commentary:

    The traditional music of Mauritania exists between worlds. It encompasses both the devotional aspect of Islamic life in North Africa, and the rhythmic energy and group interplay of sub-Saharan "black" Africa. . .Abba and her husband, Khalifa Ould Eide, were both born into the iggawin, or griot, tradition. In Mauritania, griots are a caste apart, regarded simultaneously as truth-telling folksingers, keepers of the poetry and heritage, and wizards in possession of paranormal powers. . .Like other Islamic singers, Abba doesn't always stay within a given tonality—when she's really riled up, her adlibs veer into wild quarter-tones and semitones that are manifestations of pure spirit. . .
    My thoughts:

    I had to listen to this one three times. It's not my wheelhouse...but it is. I enjoy Dead Can Dance because of the power of Lisa Gerrard's voice. This is the same--the only reason this recording could be considered in the top 1000 is because Dimi Mint Abba is a voice sorceress.

    It reminds me a bit of the Robert Johnson paradox. His original recordings the quality is so bad and the instrumentation so sparse--yet you can't deny the raw power--but you might prefer to listen to the Clapton/Cream version of Crossroads.

    It's a good album and I enjoyed the time spent listening. Maybe start at 28:30, the next 15 minutes are probably the best of the recording.

    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  6. The Following 2 Users High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


  7. #4

    Default

    3. Muhal Richard Abrams Orchestra, Blu Blu Blu (1991, Jazz), C-


    It's becoming clearer that my grades will reflect how I like a genre rather than the intrinsic quality of a recording to someone who is genre-neutral. Some people just don't like certain genres, even if you give them the essence of genius from that genre. Is it possible to be genre-neutral?

    That is what I am going to do. Really get into the spirit of this thing and suspend presumptions and conventions within my own listening mind. I'm going native here.

    So...suggestions? How am I supposed to enjoy jazz?

    I found this snippet and I like it because I am a musician and can relate to the idea of improvisation and micro-songs or sketches within a broad framework.

    …when I talk to people who find jazz musically intimidating, or unintelligible in its refusal to be as repetitive as popular music, I sometimes tell them to try to hear in the solos little musical structures, any one of which could be a song in itself, but each of which is built, explored, and discarded with breakneck speed. Popular music relies on the ecstasy of trance: repetition of what resonates. Jazz relies more on restless exploration.
    I'll grade it later, I didn't want to forget to address the dichotomy between genre quality and quality within genre.

    edit: graded
    Last edited by Hawgdriver; 03-07-2017 at 10:48 PM.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  8. The Following User High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sheridan, Wyoming
    Adopted Bronco:
    Chris Harris Jr.
    Posts
    4,088

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgdriver View Post
    3. Muhal Richard Abrams Orchestra, Blu Blu Blu (1991, Jazz), __


    It's becoming clearer that my grades will reflect how I like a genre rather than the intrinsic quality of a recording to someone who is genre-neutral. Some people just don't like certain genres, even if you give them the essence of genius from that genre. Is it possible to be genre-neutral?

    That is what I am going to do. Really get into the spirit of this thing and suspend presumptions and conventions within my own listening mind. I'm going native here.

    So...suggestions? How am I supposed to enjoy jazz?

    I found this snippet and I like it because I am a musician and can relate to the idea of improvisation and micro-songs or sketches within a broad framework.



    I'll grade it later, I didn't want to forget to address the dichotomy between genre quality and quality within genre.
    Wish I had an answer for you and a number of our other posters. I love it. Still I'm biased. I played it through college. It is...freedom...to explore and navigate uncharted waters.

    How much have you listened to and what artists?
    2009 Broncos Forums Pick'em King
    2011 Broncos Forums Survival Football Champion


  10. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgdriver View Post
    3. Muhal Richard Abrams Orchestra, Blu Blu Blu (1991, Jazz), __


    It's becoming clearer that my grades will reflect how I like a genre rather than the intrinsic quality of a recording to someone who is genre-neutral. Some people just don't like certain genres, even if you give them the essence of genius from that genre. Is it possible to be genre-neutral?

    That is what I am going to do. Really get into the spirit of this thing and suspend presumptions and conventions within my own listening mind. I'm going native here.

    So...suggestions? How am I supposed to enjoy jazz?

    I found this snippet and I like it because I am a musician and can relate to the idea of improvisation and micro-songs or sketches within a broad framework.



    I'll grade it later, I didn't want to forget to address the dichotomy between genre quality and quality within genre.
    I love the idea of suspending presumptions and conventions to try and really explore it. I am just scratching the surface in learning more about meditation and trying to introduce those concepts more in all facets of my life. Less knee jerk judgments, more neutral observation of the present reality. I am mostly failing thus far.

    Brief aside: I saw Yo-Yo Ma live last year and desperately wanted to appreciate it more but I just found myself wanting to go to sleep. I think it's a holdover from my angsty adolescence where I only listened to metal and shunned everything else to signal to everyone how hardcore I was. I want to learn from your experience here - share your tactics.

  11. The Following 2 Users High Fived Buff For This Post:


  12. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Canmore View Post
    Wish I had an answer for you and a number of our other posters. I love it. Still I'm biased. I played it through college. It is...freedom...to explore and navigate uncharted waters.

    How much have you listened to and what artists?
    I've probably listened to Coltrane the most of any jazz musician. There was a 2-month period in my early twenties when all I would listen to was jazz, but since then I haven't put on a recording and enjoyed it from reel to reel more than once or twice. Besides Coltrane, in my own collection are recordings from Crusaders (a favorite of my dad), Stan Getz, Bob James, Hubert Laws, Joe Sample, W. Marsalis, Miles Davis, and Herbie Mann. I've also listened to some Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, and Django Reinhardt (jazz?) via youtube.

    Outside of Getz and Coltrane, nothing has really grabbed me, but that doesn't mean I don't like it. It's a state between indifference and enjoyment.

    I like the Mars Volta a lot, which seems like it should be some form of jazz.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  13. #8

    Default

    Cool idea. I don't have the patience to go through it all. Never heard of the book.

    I'm looking through the World Music section though and seeing what good things I can find. Thanks for introducing me to this list

  14. The Following User High Fived aberdien For This Post:


  15. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Adopted Bronco:
    Son of Bum
    Posts
    37,276

    Default

    Who is T Moon?
    Quote Originally Posted by Day1BroncoFan View Post
    I'm happier than tom brady in a gay bar....
    Quote Originally Posted by Buff View Post
    MY post was uber-loser spin.

  16. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Adopted Bronco:
    Glenn Martinez, Rahim Moore
    Posts
    22,105

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slim View Post
    Who is T Moon?
    Free agent 4 tech

  17. The Following 4 Users High Fived BeefStew25 For This Post:


  18. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slim View Post
    Who is T Moon?
    Some random dude with a list of 1000 recordings named Tom Moon. Not sure his credentials. I linked a website with his list, above.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  19. The Following User High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


  20. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sheridan, Wyoming
    Adopted Bronco:
    Chris Harris Jr.
    Posts
    4,088

    Default

    You obviously have listened. For me, jazz is my favorite.
    2009 Broncos Forums Pick'em King
    2011 Broncos Forums Survival Football Champion


  21. The Following User High Fived Canmore For This Post:


  22. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgdriver View Post
    I've probably listened to Coltrane the most of any jazz musician. There was a 2-month period in my early twenties when all I would listen to was jazz, but since then I haven't put on a recording and enjoyed it from reel to reel more than once or twice. Besides Coltrane, in my own collection are recordings from Crusaders (a favorite of my dad), Stan Getz, Bob James, Hubert Laws, Joe Sample, W. Marsalis, Miles Davis, and Herbie Mann. I've also listened to some Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, and Django Reinhardt (jazz?) via youtube.

    Outside of Getz and Coltrane, nothing has really grabbed me, but that doesn't mean I don't like it. It's a state between indifference and enjoyment.

    I like the Mars Volta a lot, which seems like it should be some form of jazz.
    Effing A hermano. Mars Volta.



    Dude gets down on those bongos like a champ.

  23. The Following User High Fived Slick For This Post:


  24. #14

    Default

    4. The Abyssinian Baptist Choir, Shakin' the Rafters (1960, Gospel) D+

    I am not a gospel listener. But... During my 1-year Korea tour in the service, I ended up becoming very involved with the Osan AB protestant church/service. Joined the choir, played guitar during communion, helped the catholic peeps build a monastery in backwoods Korea. Was the main thing I did outside of the old fly, fight and win.1 I really got off on singing in choir. What do ping pong ball tricks in Tong Du Chon have compared to singing about glory?

    Exotic vajayge?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hqdefault (1).jpg 
Views:	2 
Size:	9.7 KB 
ID:	10242

    Then perhaps I did Korea wrong.

    Tom Moon nails it:

    The three mortals who make up this screaming locomotive of a rhythm section jolt the 120 Abyssinian voices out of the Sunday-services routine into near-ecstatic communication they sustain from the beginning of this disc to the end. The songs are mostly Bradford originals, expressions of faith and praise that emulate the works of legendary gospel composer Thomas A. Dorsey (see p. 233). Several of them belong alongside Dorsey's best, including "Said I Wasn't Gonna Tell Nobody," which is resolute from the opening line, and the 6/8 blues "He Is Such an Understanding God." Loaded with crackling call-and-response exchanges and outbreaks of intricately contrapuntal soul-clapping jubilation, these feature hot solo singing from Calvin White and Margaret Simpson, but they're never really solo vehicles. The choir is right there, contributing asides and shouts, blasting past doubt and despair with a contagious energy most often associated with the early days of rock and roll.
    If you are agnostic or similar, resolute on not being moved by religion and its trappings, the act of praising a higher power could easily cause feelings of condescension or superiority to arise from within. Those feelings could ruin listening to otherwise groovy music. This is a microcosm of this listening project. You have to will yourself to be the prime audience to really give the recording a chance. So I say **** it, I'm a 60's black girl with a big ass love for Jesus, and I can't wait until Sunday so I can sing out all this love I have inside.



    Recording quality is a factor here.

    Quite good, has its moments. Sound quality is the main reason...would like more power from the rhythm section in the recording.

    1. Throwing MO an Oxford bone.
    Last edited by Hawgdriver; 03-05-2017 at 10:49 PM.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  25. The Following User High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


  26. #15

    Default

    5. AC/DC, Back in Black (1980, Rock) B-

    The album's tightly wound radio songs—"Shoot to Thrill," the proud peacock strut "Back in Black," and the explosive "You Shook Me All Night Long"—share a mean streak. The rhythm section gets right near the boiling point and then hangs there, waiting for the schoolboy-uniform–wearing Angus Young to deliver demonically twisted lead guitar that pushes things over the edge. He always comes through: Every last solo here is a thrill ride.
    It's great when every single last song on a recording stands on its own, as here. Extremely well-produced, this is the essence of hard arena rock and it listens just as well in 2017 as in 1980.

    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

  27. The Following User High Fived Hawgdriver For This Post:


Go
Shop AFC Champions and Super Bowl gear at the official online Pro Shop of the Denver Broncos!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
status.broncosforums.com - BroncosForums status updates
dedicated servers
Partner with the USA Today Sports Media Group