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Thread: T. Moon's 1,000 recordings to hear before you die

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    Quote Originally Posted by Canmore View Post
    Liked this album. I'm not going to try and grade it. Nor will I probably with future albums. Still, I found this really interesting. Really liked track 2 the blues.
    Yeah, the grades ... it's my attempt to provide a guide to others. You know, if hawg likes X and Y, and he likes Z...

    Some of these recordings are really different. It might take a while to appreciate. Maybe never? Maybe after they grow on you, they are the best.

    I think I might end up liking this recording more than some of the others for its playfulness and homage to ragtime.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    15. Arthur Alexander, The Ultimate Arthur Alexander (R&B, 60's) D+

    Worth a listen, some tasty cuts. Great singer. This was playing in the background when Dave was having a malt with a skirt at the diner.

    That lack of success is a great mystery, because there's passion and grit inside everything Alexander recorded. His nimble, unassuming voice had a touch of George Jones in it; like Jones, he could make generic odes of lost love instantly riveting. At the same time, Alexander was a Southern soul man with Otis Redding's ability to work a groove


    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    16. Alice in Chains, Dirt (Rock, 1992) B

    What can I say? I'm super familiar with this recording and listened to it a bajillion times in high school. Does it hold up?

    When I listen to Them Bones all the way through, then Dam That River comes along and it rocks, I don't want to stop listening. Rain When I Die is so good. Sickman is good. Damn good. **** this album kicked so much ass, how could I forget. Rooster is solid. Junkhead ('what's my drug of choiiiiiiiiiiiiiice...'). Like PJ Ten, they simply crushed this recording up and down the tracklist. It's damn good!

    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    17. Mose Allison, Allison Wonderland (Vocals, 60's) C-

    60's hipster crooning. Tasteful. What I'd expect to hear in a hipster coffee place.
    Last edited by Hawgdriver; 03-08-2017 at 12:08 AM.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    I still find it a bit odd that there's a book about the 1000 recordings to hear before you die. Is there an audio version with the recordings?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper Dan View Post
    I still find it a bit odd that there's a book about the 1000 recordings to hear before you die. Is there an audio version with the recordings?
    Yes but it's in braille.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    18. The Allman Brothers Band, At Fillmore East (Rock, 1971) C+

    Tom Moon is a fan of
    Key Tracks: "Midnight Rider," "Whipping Post," "Statesboro Blues"
    except Midnight Rider isn't on this recording.

    He could be referring to The 1971 Fillmore East Recordings, a 6 CD set. Those recordings also include Midnight Rider, Mountain Jam, and One Way Out.

    Regardless, the single disc has insane recordings of In Memory of Elizabeth Reed and Whipping Post, both of which capture the essence of the band with Duane and might be the diamonds of the band's oeuvre. Not my personal favorites, but maybe they should be.

    Great live album. I might like Eat a Peach better.

    Last edited by Hawgdriver; 03-08-2017 at 12:30 AM.
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    19. The Almanac Singers, The Complete General Recordings (Folk, 1941) D-

    * yawn *

    I get that I'm supposed to nut over Woody Guthrie. I'm not buying the hype. Hey, I give it a D-, not an F. Give me the Billy Bragg & Wilco versions errday.

    Modern folk music might have started before this—musicologist Alan Lomax once fixed the date at March 3, 1940, when Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie met at a migrant worker benefit concert. But these 1941 recordings, which feature Seeger (initially identified as "Pete Bowers") and Guthrie, mark a beginning in terms of temperament: Here, typical folk fare (songs of the sea) is offset by early activist screeds on the rights of workers and American involvement in World War II.
    Tell me what you think.





    The Dodger Song is kinda rad.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    20. Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, Whipped Cream and Other Delights (Pop, 1965) C-

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    These are elite musicians if you didn't know. For example, drums by Hal Blaine. Take a moment and read about Hal Blaine because he's in the rock and roll HOF, really a candidate for best drummer of all time, and you probably haven't heard of him.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hal_Blaine

    the band's general sound was decidedly unique in those early British Invasion days—no other recording act was fusing traditional Mexican music (the mariachi fanfares that herald bullfights) with jazz, Brazilian samba, and R&B, a curious but utterly workable combination
    Good music.

    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    21. Los Amigos Invisibles, Arepa 3000: A Venezuelan Journey into Space (World/Venezuela, 2000) C

    Despite the subtitle, there's no space exploration on the second U.S. release from the super-inventive Venezuelan dance band Los Amigos Invisibles. There is, however, a fair bit of time travel: One minute the six-piece ensemble is chasing (and nattily embellishing) a retro '60s mod vibe, complete with shimmering organ. Then along comes a snappy drum loop, and suddenly the pulse quickens, and we're three hours into some Ibiza rave circa 2000, with the DJ spinning a weird mix of samba and stutter-stepping rhythm at 180 beats per minute.
    These guys are kind of nutty but it makes the music interesting. Creative, inventive. Danceable. A latin, early RHCP (twenty years later lol) not afraid to bend genres.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    319. Fleetwood Mac, Fleetwood Mac / Buckingham Nicks (Rock, 1975) A-

    I had to jump ahead. No, I didn't, but I did. The actual book is here, on my desk. I flipped it open and read, and I had to listen to some stuff. It lead to this album. This is not some special favorite, but this is enough of a great album that I had to give something a high grade to show that I'm not some hardass that only gives out C's and D's and an occasional B.





    The album cover disturbs me. Font, composition, subjects.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    316. The Flaming Lips, The Soft Bulletin (Rock, 1999) A-

    I want to give this an A. Temperance.

    One of my favorite albums, and a terrific recording when you look at it from a distance.



    Pitchfork did a great job with this story.

    Edit: I had to give it an A. First was a B+.
    Last edited by Hawgdriver; 03-12-2017 at 08:34 PM.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    I found a few solid "A" recordings, at least in my book:

    Michael Jackson, Thriller
    Jane's Addiction, Ritual de lo Habitual
    Nine Inch Nails, The Downward Spiral
    Pink Floyd, Dark Side of the Moon

    Ok. Discipline.

    A to Z.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    22. Albert Ammons and Meade "Lux" Lewis, The First Day (Jazz, 1939) D+

    I downgrade this recording solely on the basis of recording quality. Piano in lo-fi loses so much detail and presence. This would be close to an ideal jazz-blues recording for a piano guy like me. Great musicians. If the sound quality was pristine, I'd bump it up a letter grade.

    They're also some of the least ostentatious piano-boogie recordings of all time. The feeling throughout is loose and relaxed, as both pianists are inclined to paw through ambling themes rather than do the high-octane show-off thing. Lewis is the nuts-and-bolts guy; his pieces move at an easygoing clip, and drift out of tempo every once in a while. Ammons is the barn burner: His "Boogie Woogie Stomp" swings with a giddy ferociousness, like he's dancing with the piano. His aptly titled "Bass Goin' Crazy" is a series of scale-like runs with a serious wow factor.

    Lots of boogie had that impact. What sets Ammons and Lewis apart is their shared insistence that there's more going on than just dazzling look-how-fast-the-left-hand-moves demonstrations. The First Day has the expected bells and whistles—the wildcatting lines, irreverent shout choruses, and slipping and sliding mayhem that spans the length of the keyboard. But it's also got some blues reflection in it, and moments of poignancy that are precious now, considering how showbiz-sensational boogie-woogie soon became.
    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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    23. Marian Anderson, Spirituals (Gospel, 1936-52) C-

    She's got some pipes. Recording quality a factor, but some of these atomic age recordings have better fidelity.
    After hearing Marian Anderson (1897–1993) sing in Salzburg in 1935, conductor Arturo Toscanini remarked that "a voice like hers is heard only once in a hundred years." Alas, it took a while for listeners in her homeland to appreciate the smooth contralto with a superb range. Like many African American artists, Anderson faced ongoing and entrenched racial discrimination. Ironically, she rose to prominence after one such incident: In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution canceled an Easter Sunday recital in Washington, D.C., because of Anderson's color. This caused an uproar: First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt renounced her DAR membership, and a free concert at the Lincoln Memorial was scheduled. Seventy-five thousand people came to hear her sing. The performance made her a star and a symbol of equal rights.
    This one comes across as a mix of gospel, funeral march in the mode of Chopin, and blues. Strong stuff.

    The sharp edge of a razor is difficult to pass over; thus the wise say the path to Salvation is hard.

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