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Thread: Workout thread

  1. #16
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    I've been told what you're saying by others as well. I know it is an individual thing. I did the three days a week plan and full body when I was younger but my goals were different then and I took the other four days off.

    The last thing I need is another injury.

    I have changed my diet since I started working out. I'll get into that later too. I have to go play with my family now.

    I don't really have a weight goal, I just have some BF I need to drop. I have gained weight since starting. I went from 179 to 187 and am now around 183. That's by the scale at the gym.
    Merry.

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    Couple of things to add today.

    Free weight vs Machines/cable systems

    -----------------------------------------------------
    Free weights are inherently a better workout, and produce better long term health so long as used properly, you do not use excessive weight for your personal ability, and you use proper form.

    Why are free weights better for your health? Stabilizing muscles. When using a machine or a cable system the weight and motion is generally directed for you. You aren't using stabilizing or ancillary muscles. These are important because when using machines its almost always an exercise built for isolation, and since the machine will generally try and make the form you use while exercising stupid proof the machine does not allow you to direct the weight in other directions then the its specific design. That means you'll build a lot of strength, but only in very specific areas, and only the largest muscles. Now, that's great right? Not really....

    If you then apply the strength you've gained in the machines to real life circumstances, such as trying to move a piano for example. Then suddenly one set of muscles will be very strong, and your stabilizing or ancillary muscles will be very weak, your chances for injury increase by quite a bit. The longer you use machines exclusively or the majority of the time, the higher the chance that you could cause injury to these small muscles. It may seem, since they are the smaller muscles that injury to them will not be a big deal, but they can be a major problem when injured including limiting range of motion and tons of pain that follows it.

    It's much the same as using treadmill. If some of you aren't aware, a treadmill is much the same problem and cannot be equally linked to the workout you receive in a real run outside or indoors. That's because the treadmill is moving the ground for you. You are using muscles to stay upright, and move your legs at a similar pace, but you aren't using your muscles to actually propel yourself. To move yourself forward as you would normally. I think its a great idea to start running on a treadmill since its a bit easier, but doing so exclusively for long periods of time (say a year) can cause injuries down the way if you do start running normally.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    That's the rant for the day. Here's a few facts and some info to think about.

    Fact #1 - Working out in the morning will achieve better weight loss, however you will not build more muscle mass. That's because you come out of your fast from the night. After all the reason they call it breakfast is to break your fast from the good sleep yoru hopefully having. You lose more fat because your body is basically nutrient deprived in the morning. Of course there will be triglycerides and proteins (synthesized into amino acids most likely) still in your system depending on your diet, but overall there isn't much energy for your body to use. Therefor it will use both adrenaline, and quickly work to fat to supply the energy you need for workout. Normally your body will suck what energy you still have in your blood stream before you start burning fat. This cuts to the chase and your body will get to the fat as quickly as your workout will allow.

    Muscle needs those nutrients much faster, and fat cannot always supply it as fast since its a complex and difficult route for fat to be burned off, so doing mass building workout in the morning (unless quickly followed by food) will deprive the muscles of the energy it needs to build. Obviously if you eat before you workout, this doesn't apply unless you eat directly or very shortly before you workout. In the case of cardio workouts, this will increase the likelihood of cramps.

    Fact #2 - Fat cells are tons of energy contained in tiny little sacks. When you burn fat the body sucks the energy out of these sacks, but the sacks remain in the body. These sacks can take up to five years (more often 2 -3 years) to be broken down by the body. While they remain, it is very easy for the body to refill these sacks with nutrients when you have rich meals or stop working out. That's why its so hard to keep fat off since the body finds it very easy to refill the sack.

    Interesting Info - 15 Metabolism Boosting Foods (and healthy)

    http://www.ecosalon.com/boost-metabolism/
    Last edited by BigBroncLove; 05-27-2010 at 06:36 PM.
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  4. #18
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    BigBroncLove,

    I agree with your assessment of the free weights versus machines. I am using machines at the moment but intend to start with some free weights in the near future, possibly even next week. In fact, I plan on remodeling my entire workout possibly by next week. I have to come up with a plan for what exercises I will be doing first though.

    My diet right now is a shake in the morning. The shake consists of one scoop of protein mix, 8 oz. of soy milk, some berries of one kind or another and a banana. I drink this right after waking up. I fill a water bottle with a sport drink I mix up from a powder (I am changing to a different one) or just plain water. I take the water bottle with me to the gym and drink it as I go along. When I get back home I mix up another scoop of protein with just water, drink it and eat an apple. I have some coffee also. D:

    I snack on some healthy snacks during the morning. I have leftover food from the previous days evening meal for lunch or Iíll have a bagel with sunflower butter (like peanut butter). The leftover food usually includes a small amount of salad and can be anything but isnít something unhealthy. I may snack a little more in the afternoon depending on what Iím doing. The snacks I eat are pretty healthy stuff, no potato chips or things like that. For supper I have what my wife prepares which is usually fairly healthy. It can be anything from steaks I BBQ, fish or pasta of some sort.

    I could eat a lot healthier but I still want to enjoy life. I love my occasional piece of cheesecake and the bowl of ice cream.

    Interesting information about the fat cells, I will need to be careful about regaining any weight I lose. I am not really trying to lose weight but I could be about 20 pounds lighter or, at least switch 20 pounds of fat for 20 pounds of muscle.

    I used one of those online calorie counters and came up with about 2700 calories I burn a day. Iím not sure how much I am eating but some of the fat places are getting smaller, which I like.

    There it is for all to see. Now you know more or less what I eat but not how much although, it has been reported by some of my friends they count me as two people when inviting me over for food. I donít know whether I should be offended by that or not.
    Merry.

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  6. #19
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    Hey man,

    Sounds good. I'll post sometime some free weight workout on a per muscle basis and compound workouts vs isolation some other time. The free weights vs machines is a proven fact. Say when your bench pressing. When you lift the bar up and do the exercise you have to keep the bar stable. that works those stabilizing muscles. Machiens are on a track and you won't use em. There's a lot of good material about it, and I said in my first post I hope you do a lot of research on your own.

    As for dietary concerns, that's just the hardest thing gauge on a per person basis. Everyone is different, and as far as a persons metabolic rate given to weight, age, muscle mass, sleep cycles, blah blah. Basically its impossible to pin point on a per person basis, but if you're seeing results that's all that counts.

    A couple things to always be careful of...

    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    Fact #1 - If you are taking to low of caloric intake your body will enter what is known as survival mode. Most people think the more you diet the more weight you lose. That's true but you won't lose weight in the form of fat but rather as muscle. Fat is one of the hardest things for the body to breakdown. It is a very complex set of conditions that must be met. In "survival" mode when the body has so little energy, breaking down fat becomes to difficult. The body will take the path of least resistance and breakdown muscle instead, which is much easier, equally packed in energy, and weighs more than fat. So often people dieting to this point will lose plenty of weight on the scale, just not the weight you want to lose. For women survival mode is generally considered 800 - 1,000 calories per day or lower. For men between 1,000 - 1,200 or lower.

    -------------------------------------

    Fact #2 - One pound of fat is equal to 3,500 calories. Even on the best of days in which you workout very hard, so long as you're eating healthy and properly, its hard to create more than a 500 calorie deficit. Do the math and that's 5 days working hard and eating right to just drop one pound of fat.

    -------------------------------------

    Fact #3 - Water weight is massive portion of a persons body. Often when someone sees immediate results in working out on the scale, its water weight they've lost. I generally consider it a bad idea to continually look at any scale. Not only because of water weight but if your adding muscle and losing fat, you might actually gain weight though your doing exactly what you need to be. Far better to let the mirror show you the results.

    -------------------------------------

    Fact #4 - One way to boost your metabolism very easily is through green tea and coffee. These were both in the 15 metabolism boosting foods article I linked to earlier. Coffee will generally increase a persons caloric output on a day to day absis by 100 calories. It does this by blocking the receptors that accept Adenosine which is the hormone that makes you tired. The body reacts to that by thinking there is an emergency in your body and it releases adrenaline as a result, which is why if you drink to much coffee you can get jittery. This increase in heart rate will increase your caloric output by 100 calories. Green tea releases EGCG which increases neurological activity. The brain as an organ is the single greatest consumers of glucose in the body. A harder working brain needs more nutrients and it needs a lot. On average, having EGCG on a daily basis in the body will increase caloric output by 76 calories. That's 176 calories per day you can increase your metabolism by drinking just two cups. That's equivalent to a mile and half run at a 7:30 pace per mile.

    -----------------------------------

    Fact #5 - Carbs are the best food for your body to break down, because its the easiest form of energy to do so, but of course it comes with the risk of adding fat easily. Reading the Glycemic Index can help you avoid the pitfalls of bad carbs. Carbohydrates break down at different speeds depending on how processed they are. This is important to understand. Imagine eating one piece of bread and having the nutrients slowly digested in your system. It's a slow trail fo nutrients that hit your body at a rate thats easy to absorb and use properly. Then imagine a piece of bread that your body digests immediately. A huge chunk of nutrients rushes through your body and your system isn't able to absorb the nutrients because of its natural limitations. The additional nutrients not used in that big chunk will then be turned to fat. That's why whole grains are so good for you, they digest slowly and give your body time to absorb them and use them properly.

    Glycemic Index Table (not complete)
    Last edited by BigBroncLove; 05-28-2010 at 04:37 PM.
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  8. #20
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    Just ran my first 10k (6.75 miles actually) this weekend with a time of 49.50, averaging a 7.26 minute mile on a very hilly course. Took 4th in the men's division overall. Not too shabby, have a 7 mile leg of a marathon relay on Saturday.

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  10. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BMF Bronco View Post
    Just ran my first 10k (6.75 miles actually) this weekend with a time of 49.50, averaging a 7.26 minute mile on a very hilly course. Took 4th in the men's division overall. Not too shabby, have a 7 mile leg of a marathon relay on Saturday.
    not bad at all.

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  12. #22
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    Great showing BMF!

    I changed my workout a little this week. I started doing some dumbbells instead of all the machines. Like I said, it's a work in progress. I have some new sore mucles today.

    I plan on getting a workout down with the dumbbells and incorporating some ab stuff into it to make it a full body.
    Merry.

  13. #23
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    How has the transition to free weights gone for you so far? Have you chosen to break your muscle groups up? If so how has that gone?

    Haven't stopped in here for a bit and it seems, given I have some free time at the moment, to go on a rant about compound workouts vs isolation workouts.

    Compound vs Isolation -

    Isolation workouts are the most common free weight exercises used and can be very effective workouts. They attack specific sets of muscles extremely well and allow a person to break up their muscle groups to be able to allow them to heal while other muscle groups are exercised in following days. While Isolation workouts are effective and IMO should always be used, they will with time create problems with plateauing and directly effect real world application of strength.

    The plateauing difficulty generally relates to the lack of extremely varied motions in isolation workouts. Outside of deltoids, the motion you use for these workouts are very limited, and when they do workout sometimes even the muscles you are attacking with isolation workouts will only effect a portion of that muscle group. For example....

    Deltoids - Front arm raises effect the front of the deltoid specifically but very very little of the back of the deltoid. The opposite can be said for side arm raises. They attack more of the rear deltoid, but you do get more front delt work in the side arm raise then you do rear delt work in the front arm raise.

    Tricep - the rear tricep is very rarely used in any isolation workout for your triceps. Almost all tricep workouts including the more advanced isolation workouts, all attack the front tricep. Only one isolation workout works the back tricep and that's the one arm reverse pulldown.

    Even if they attack the full muscle such as deltoid shoulder presses or pectoral dumbbell flys, isolation workouts burn less calories and reduce the real world application of strength in their workouts. Some muscles like the bicep cannot be attack effectively outside of isolation workout for example.

    ---------------------------

    Compound workout are different. they attack multiple muscle groups at once. Often increasing caloric output on a per workout basis, improves overall exercise of ancillary or stabilizing muscles, improves muscle balance at joints, decreases the likelihood of injury in real world applications of strength, adds an element to your free weight exercises that can avoid plateau's, and 100% increases the pace of your strength building.

    Compound workouts use multiple muscles in a single workout. Since your using more msucles you usually can lift more weight, often allowing you to break through to the next level and avoid a plateau. Since you are using more weight usually this is more of an advanced workout. Also given these are the type of exercises you use to try and lift more then you would generally dare in isolation, the risk of injury increases during these workouts, and building a base of muscle through military and free weight isolation workouts is very important before moving to compound workouts. Also obviously you burn more calories and achieve a larger full body workout. This means more soreness across board so its important for your body to be able to respond to that, which makes building strength through military and isolation workouts that much more important. Simply put, these are more advanced and harder workouts with increased likelihood of injury, so you have to know what you're doing and make sure to not overstep your bounds while still pushing the limit to a degree. Here is a small list of compound workouts.

    Bench Press - Works Pec, Deltoid, Tricep
    Standing Military Press - Works Deltoid, Tricep, Trapz (neck)
    Pendlay Row - Works Upper back, Deltoid, Lower back, Bicep slightly
    Dead Lifts -works Lower back, gluts (ass), quads, deltoid slightly. Disclaimer: This workout, its very easy to throw out your back, be sure to always keep weight low when starting, use proper form, and be smart.
    Squat - Works Gluts, lower back, quads, to a degree calves. Simply put, the best lower body workout you can do (obviously not you Day1 with your knees)
    Pulls ups/Chin Ups - Works Deltoids, Upper back, biceps (chin up), lats. Important not to use yoru legs or lower body to create momentum to achieve the pull up, known as kipping in the USMC.
    Dips Works Triceps, pecs, deltoids slightly.

    There's more but I'll stop there. I would suggest, as you've seen in a few of the videos, researching the Ripptoe program and also going through all of his videos in achieving the perfect form to create the best workout in compound workouts. Also remember with compound workouts a lot of people stack the weights high and do a much lower count of reps (say 5 - 7) rather then the 10 usually applied to isolation workouts. Great way to increase strenght but know what you're doing before that, as chance of injury will increase with weight.

    All that said I think its important to use a combination of both compound and isolation workouts. You'll achieve a great deal of success that way and always keep the body guessing, especially if you insert a military workout day. As said before some muscles you cannot work effectively otuside of isolation such as the bicep, trapz (neck), abs, calves. I would also suggest researching compound vs isolation workotus elsewhere as I am sure others have put the reason to use compound workouts in a better fashion and likely far more succinctly than myself.
    Last edited by BigBroncLove; 06-16-2010 at 02:31 PM.
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  15. #24
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    I bought a pair of asic running shoes last night. I want to start running again in the evening instead of going home and cracking open a beer. I hope that this will inspire me to get started

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    Actually I started the Riptoe "Starting Strength" program this week after doing some research.

    Since I'm not really a total beginner I have modified it a little...

    workout A
    squats
    bench press
    deadlifts
    calf raises (standing and sitting)
    ab work

    Workout b
    squats
    military press
    bent bb rows (I changed this because I don't have any one to give me instructions on the clean)
    calf raises (standing and sitting)
    ab work

    I will ad some more stuff to that soon. I'll try some chinups next then add some arm work.
    Merry.

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    I was doing Tai Chi for a while a few years ago. I am thinking about trying to do that again. THere' s a guy here at work who teaches it. It was pretty therapeutic.

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  20. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bronconut View Post
    I was doing Tai Chi for a while a few years ago. I am thinking about trying to do that again. THere' s a guy here at work who teaches it. It was pretty therapeutic.
    I've never done Tai Chi but I am doing yoga 2 days a week. I like it for the flexiblity and overall balance it helps with. Tai Chi takes to much concentration for me. You have to learn all those moves. In yoga you just do what the intructor says and modify if you need to.
    Merry.

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  22. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Day1BroncoFan View Post
    I've never done Tai Chi but I am doing yoga 2 days a week. I like it for the flexiblity and overall balance it helps with. Tai Chi takes to much concentration for me. You have to learn all those moves. In yoga you just do what the intructor says and modify if you need to.
    I might look into that with what you say here. there are a lot of steps. In tai chi, I could follow the instructor pretty well :sofukincute: but when he wasn't there, I was a babe in the woods.

  23. #29
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    10 mile Jim Bridger Trail Run on Saturday, 2000 feet of elevation, going to be by far the toughest test I have faced thus far this year.

    Forgot to mention that two weekends ago my marathon relay team took second in the relay division, did my 7.7 miles in 53.04.

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  25. #30
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    I like Ripptoe's program but do not adhere to it specifically. Ripptoe would say, "Then your not taking my program" heheh which is true, but the workouts he has don't really attack the calfs, abs, and especially the biceps with any regularity.

    I do a week of ripptoe and week of isolation. I will always add a day for biceps, and of course tend to reduce my running from a 2.5 - 3 mile run every other day to about a 1.5 mile run to make sure my legs are always properly perpared for the squats and I get the most out of them. Though I will increase the pace, though not markedly so. I usually do a pretty lax 7:30 min per mile pace run, but on the ripptoe week will do a 6:45 - 7:00 min pace.

    As for bent BB rows, I would suggest using the Pendlay form of BB rows, simply because its more effective for the upper back and gives IMO a better workout. I changed the order of things to have a real upper body and lower body day in ripptoes program.

    Here's my schedule for compound week to give you an idea of what I do.

    Day 1
    Run 1.5 mile
    Benchpress 4x10
    Military Press 4x7
    Pendlay Row 4x7
    Pull ups 4xmax each set
    Situps on sit bench with weights 4x20

    Day 2
    Squats 4x7
    Deadlifts 4x7
    Barbell lunges 4x7
    Dips 4xmax each set
    Crunches/Supine Bicycles 4x50

    Day 3
    Run 1.5 mile
    Preacher bench 4x10
    Bicep Isolation Curls 4x10
    Standing Barbell Curls 4x10
    Hammer Ons 4x10
    Oblique isolators with weights 4x10
    Situps ons sit bench 4x35-40
    Lat Pull down 4x10

    Repeat Day1

    Repeat Day2

    Rest 2 days

    Isolation Week
    Last edited by BigBroncLove; 06-16-2010 at 04:28 PM.
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