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tripleoption
06-17-2014, 01:19 AM
OK, what are your favorite route combinations in football. Maybe something you ran in HS, College, or see in the NFL. For me, arrow-curl, spacing, and smash.

Dapper Dan
06-17-2014, 01:31 AM
Do video games count? :lol:

OrangeHoof
06-17-2014, 09:38 AM
I think taking the 470 is more convenient than I-25.

CrazyHorse
06-17-2014, 11:59 PM
Do video games count? :lol:

If so, I'll go with NFL Blitz's "Da Bomb".

sneakers
07-10-2014, 05:19 AM
Wheel route is always fun if you have a really speedy RB and a LB covering him

Shredforever
07-11-2014, 12:03 AM
I would have to say that wide receiver screen route we ran a lot last year is one of my favourites, when it works the right way.

tripleoption
07-11-2014, 12:24 AM
We had a 7 on 7 competition tonight. I called spacing about 50% of our plays and the opposing team struggled to stop it. Afterwards the opposing HC asked me if he could meet with me soon and discuss our offense with him, because he really liked the stuff we were doing and he'd like to incorporate what we do into his offense. I see lots of spacing type routes in the NFL. Sean Payton says "Spacing is the backside read to everything".

MOtorboat
07-11-2014, 12:48 AM
We had a 7 on 7 competition tonight. I called spacing about 50% of our plays and the opposing team struggled to stop it. Afterwards the opposing HC asked me if he could meet with me soon and discuss our offense with him, because he really liked the stuff we were doing and he'd like to incorporate what we do into his offense. I see lots of spacing type routes in the NFL. Sean Payton says "Spacing is the backside read to everything".

You're basically sitting under a zone on one side while the No. 1 works to get open on the other, right?

tripleoption
07-11-2014, 01:27 AM
You're basically sitting under a zone on one side while the No. 1 works to get open on the other, right?

That's the general idea. The QB takes a pre snap read and decides if he'll throw to the single receiver side. If he feels he can't make the throw due to the defensive structure, then he goes backside to the spacing route. From inside out the #3 runs an arrow route, the #2 runs a sit route, and the #3 runs a mini curl. It's called spacing because the receivers are working to have roughly 6-8 yards of space between them as they break back to the QB.

This diagram shows spacing from a bunch set. I'll run spacing from bunch, stacked and regular trips sets. Alignment is important so you get the proper spacing between the routes:
4971

Here's good youtube video of the Colts and Ravens running spacing out of bunch:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExHRK65wGZg

MOtorboat
07-11-2014, 01:37 AM
That's the option routes the Patriots have run for years. They did it most with Randy Moss.

tripleoption
07-11-2014, 01:46 AM
That's the option routes the Patriots have run for years. They did it most with Randy Moss.

Oh, yeah, these routes have been around a long time. I first saw them at the HS level about 12 years ago. This has been my first real chance to run the spacing concept and some of the variations of them. Don't quote me on this but I believe Bill Walsh was the first one to start running spacing type concepts in the 80's with his West Coast Offense.

MOtorboat
07-11-2014, 01:51 AM
Oh, yeah, these routes have been around a long time. I first saw them at the HS level about 12 years ago. This has been my first real chance to run the spacing concept and some of the variations of them. Don't quote me on this but I believe Bill Walsh was the first one to start running spacing type concepts in the 80's with his West Coast Offense.

I think so. It also goes hand in hand with the zone concept, with a trips right (or left), single-wide opposite, and the three receivers running deep out, middle out, short out and the back running a flat route. It's about finding seams in zones. The Greatest Show on Turf did that all the time with Warner.

tripleoption
07-11-2014, 02:08 AM
There are routes and route combinations that are older than dirt but teams still run them til the cows come home because they work.:cool: I've heard there are really no new concepts in football, just resurrected concepts and taking other concepts and taking them to another level.

OrangeHoof
07-13-2014, 08:40 AM
The one thing missing here is the receiver can take the deep route if he and the QB both see the back defense cheating up. That's why it helps to have at least two guys with top speed that can either stretch the secondary to open up more space or burn the secondary with the deep ball if the underneath routes are being covered. That's what D. Thomas and Sanders give us and what J.Thomas can also do if he gets LB coverage.

tripleoption
08-05-2014, 11:51 PM
This is a really common route. I call it the smash concept. It's a great route versus most coverages, especially 2 and 3. I run the China and Bench versions in the video, but I don't call it that. For the hitch/corner, we train the inside receiver when he makes his cut to find the dead zone between the corner and safety. If the corner sits it becomes what I call a dead zone out. The QB reads the CB. If the CB drops, he hits the hitch. If the CB plays short, look for the corner. The QB's rule is to NEVER throw the corner route over a retreating CB. I've seen this route concept and variations of it run many times in NFL and college games.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mK8Gipg0-w

tripleoption
08-06-2014, 12:10 AM
Here is a video of the smash concept being run. It's a HS team but you get the idea. Watch the outside receiver and the middle receiver.


http://vid753.photobucket.com/albums/xx180/Kalashnikov74/2guntrips72.mp4

tripleoption
09-03-2014, 10:19 PM
Here's a good example from our last game of the spacing route. In our terminology this would be gun ricky bunch right 60 spacing. Once of the flashes of brilliance we get. Note the defending team blitzing the weak side LB. It was an automatic they had in their game plan. We get good spacing and hit the sit portion of the route.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9PxxuIxHoI&feature=youtu.be

tripleoption
03-28-2015, 01:02 AM
It's the offseason so I decided to add a bit to my thread. I posted earlier about the SMASH combination, with the outside receiver running a short hitch/out/in, and the inside receiver running a corner route. This is a very common route from HS to the NFL. Spacing and alignment are very important, which is where I think teams hurt themselves at lower levels. We teach our inside receiver on the corner route to adjust his route according to the coverage. If he sees cover 3 he cuts at 8-10 yards and takes a 45 degree angle to the sideline to keep the CB busy. If he sees a cover 2 he adjust his route and flattens it toward the sideline more to split the difference between the S and CB. The idea is to make the S cover more space than if we just ran a 45 degree corner route.
In this case the defense aligned in a 4-3 cover 2 shell. When I saw their alignment I was telling myself if our Y (the inside receiver) runs a good route this is six. You can see him adjust his route and flatten to the area between the CB who is the flat defender and the safety who is responsible for deep halves. This forced the safety into a position where he had to really chase the route after our receiver drove on him and made his cut. The ball looks like it was almost picked but the camera angle makes it look that way. I was just off the side of the screen to the right and the throw was made with plenty of room, and the safety had no chance.
In our terminology this would be gun larry 62. We put the R opposite the call to make the defense align away from the half roll. If you look it makes for a very easy double team by the C and G, and if they would've blitzed either BSLB we had them picked up by the R and the C if the MLB would blitz.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32OBY00bwhg

tripleoption
04-04-2015, 01:13 AM
Another route combination I really grew to like was our bend concept. A lot of people would call it flood, and it's basically a variation of the flood route. You have a short, medium and long route in order to stress the defense and force one player to try and cover two receivers. It's good versus any coverage, but its best versus cover 3. Here we run the bend concept vs a team that liked running cover 3. The outside receiver runs a go route to clear out. The middle receiver runs a flat route, which keeps the SS busy. Our third receiver runs the 'bend' portion of the route. He drives to 8 yards and cuts to the outside, adjusting his route to hit the area between the flat defender and deep defender. If you pause it at the 11 second mark you can see our #3 receiver come wide open, and the QB makes a good throw with a good catch.
I put this concept in specifically for this game. I saw on tape how they like to play against trips sets, and saw the opening they left between the flat defender and deep defender. NFL and college teams also run variations of this same concept. It's all just trying to get 3 receivers on 2 defenders, and in the end it's all a numbers game. A basic concept that you can make look however you want from really any formation you want.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q60LmWuT27o