PDA

View Full Version : The Screen Pass



bengaaaaals1688
12-18-2008, 11:40 PM
The screen pass, named as such because the receiver is "screened" by blockers is a play that is more commonly used by teams with quick RBs that can make plays in the open field. Although it can be used with bigger RBs as well, the set up of the play is better suited for that shifty little guy who can get up the field quickly.

In order to run a successful screen, your OL, typically your Guards and Tackles (but on some occasions you can get a Center out there as well) will pull in front of the RB. This can be a scary thing to some OCs, and for good reason, because if a DE can get off the snap fast enough he can hit your QB, and hard. The saving grace in this situation is that the screen pass is a quick developing play, and more than likely by the time the DE gets near the QB the ball has already left his hand.

The RB's route is nothing more than a simple flare route, with the bonus of having blockers in front of him. He is now on the edge with 2 mammoths that we refer to as OL, who need to block small CBs and Safeties. If the OL get out there the way it is drawn up, it will eliminate at least 2 more players, and possibly more. The RB finds the hole in between the 2 blockers and from there may only need to make one more person miss to leave themselves with nothing but green grass in front of them and a clear run to the end zone.

There have been alterations to this play that have the RB going into the middle of the field, even using a TE on a screen. The new "rage" throughout the league is the WR screen. It is essentially the same idea, except the WR starts at his usual spot and just comes closer toward the line at the snap of the ball. If the OL are quick enough to get out to the WR, then the team will use them and it gives the WR a lot of help making his own play, but more often it is other WRs blocking for them on the screen. Run a Twins or a Trips to the side of the screen and the WRs that are not getting the ball will set up in front of the screened WR to allow him more room to operate.

King87
12-20-2008, 07:11 PM
Very nice article.

To be honest I really do dislike this play in theory and in practice. Every now and again this is a fine play call. However, I never see those screens go for long plays very often. If I wanted to run a quick pass that could pick up a first down and potentially more, I would rather call a quick slant or have a big tight end run over the middle against a linebacker.

Plays like the screens are in my opinion kind of a weak call. Other than the Jets I cannot think of very many teams who can run more than one or two screens a game with any success.

What are you thoughts?

bengaaaaals1688
12-21-2008, 12:31 PM
Very nice article.

To be honest I really do dislike this play in theory and in practice. Every now and again this is a fine play call. However, I never see those screens go for long plays very often. If I wanted to run a quick pass that could pick up a first down and potentially more, I would rather call a quick slant or have a big tight end run over the middle against a linebacker.

Plays like the screens are in my opinion kind of a weak call. Other than the Jets I cannot think of very many teams who can run more than one or two screens a game with any success.

What are you thoughts?

I don't like the WR screens, at all. Too many teams run them and nobody really has any serious success with it. As far as RB screens go, I like them from time to time. The Eagles do a good job with them, when Westbrook is healthy. It's a good change of pace play, and a great way to get your RB out in the open field quickly. I don't like it too much when a team that doesn't have quick RBs, and instead runs them with a large "plodding" RB.

IMO, the best time to use the screen (even though it's starting to become a little bit more predictable recently) is on a 3rd or 2nd and long. Get your RB in space, and give him a chance to make a play behind his behemoth OL, and there's always a decent chance he can break a 15-20 yard gain, and it's much safer than trying to force a deep post into a zone.

horsepig
12-22-2008, 05:49 AM
The wr screen is a "I hope to Christ we can get the QB, AND that wr some confidence back" play. If it happens to get positive yardage great. The only time it will really work is when the D is too fast and over reacts to one side. Then you toss the wr screen to the other side, if your qb has time. You're never going to get OL out there, you put 2 wr's out and hope the corner gets sucked in and the olb is slow. The other wr "gets in the way" and you hope the target receiver gets past at least one guy, then, and only then does the play have a chance to gain anything.

bengaaaaals1688
12-22-2008, 12:29 PM
The wr screen is a "I hope to Christ we can get the QB, AND that wr some confidence back" play. If it happens to get positive yardage great. The only time it will really work is when the D is too fast and over reacts to one side. Then you toss the wr screen to the other side, if your qb has time. You're never going to get OL out there, you put 2 wr's out and hope the corner gets sucked in and the olb is slow. The other wr "gets in the way" and you hope the target receiver gets past at least one guy, then, and only then does the play have a chance to gain anything.

Which is why I don't like it... And when a CB is in man coverage on a WR, he usually shoots past the "blocking" WR before the play has even a slight chance of developing. It has become too commonplace to run those "bubble" screens, and CB's aren't stupid.

Sponsored Links